Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
SharePoint

News

Edit
  
Summary
Link
  
ImageURL
  
  
Additional Resources
Contact Person
Story
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
  

​The main purpose of the workshop on residential property markets in was eThekwini was to present the latest residential property market and to introduce an online dashboard. 

2022-02-21 12:00 AM35https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=35

​Seth Maqetuka: seth.maqetuka@treasury.gov.za

​The main purpose of the workshop on residential property markets in eThekwini was to present the latest residential property market and to introduce an online dashboard. This work is outcome of eThekwini's Research and Policy Advocacy Department (RAPA) that has been working in partnership with the Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa (CAHF) and Cities Support Programme to improve the City's data for human settlements and urban planning. The report will help metro to better plan their Human Settlements and Catalytic projects as it provides data on the performance of the housing market, government-subsidised housing, and mortgage lending. The reports has dealt with spatial challenges and how the metros can promote spatial reforms to make the city more sustainable and promote inclusive economic growth.   

9 February 2022NoResidential Property Marketshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=8888
 
  

On 8th December, the CSP and World Bank Human Settlements Team convened a follow up discussion on Community Development Programme for Sustainable Urban Upgrading and Livelihoods.

2022-02-21 12:00 AM34https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=34

​Seth Maqetuka: seth.maqetuka@treasury.gov.za

On 8th December, the CSP and World Bank Human Settlements Team convened a follow up discussion on Community Development Programme for Sustainable Urban Upgrading and Livelihoods. The enclosed report provides a summary of discussions during the CDP report back that was held a fortnight ago. At the meeting there was also a presentation from the Presidency by Dr Kate Philips on Social Employment Fund, which the CDP Team hopes to take forward to explore possibilities of synergies between Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme and CDP.

The CDP's primary goal is the creation of and the ongoing support for the social capital required to make urban poor communities into real partners in development and into central players in the transformation of our urban centres to address urban poverty and inequalities. This summary reports provides progress and challenges that the team has achieved and encountered on this essential development journey. Over the next two months the Cities Support Programme and the World Bank aim to put into action the following.

  1. work on the programme design at city network level and the project design at project level. This will involve regular and detailed engagement with CBOS and CSOs in the emerging CDP network – specifically those who express an interest in such an engagement.
  2. attempt to move the CDP pilot projects (see the attached report) forwards to the point where formal agreements between the Metro, the intermediary CSOs and the community organisations in the target settlements are signed.
  3. begin to promote city or district level networks around the proposed pilots, beginning with more active engagement with CBO/CSO stakeholders in these pilots.
  4. decide on an institutional home for the CDP.
  5. identify and pursue funding opportunities for the operations of the CDP, for pilot projects and for assessing community readiness and supporting CBOs to achieve this.
  6. Maintain regular email contact with participating CBOs and NGOs.
  7. Provide detailed feedback to the entire group by the middle of February, if not earlier.

Enclosed are thus the summary of recent discussion with the CBOs and NGOs and the CDP Concept Note that is aimed at giving background on these discussion.  


8 December 2021YesScaling Up Informal Settlements Upgradinghttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=88
 
  

​The Centre of Affordable Housing Finance in Africa (CAHF) in partnership with GTAC has produced for the CSP and its partners a focus note on the impact of municipal rates policies on the affordable sector.

2021-11-30 12:00 AM24https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=24
Seth Maqetuka: seth.maqetuka@treasury.gov.za
Alison Tshangana: alison@housingfinanceafrica.org
Kecia Rust: kecia@housingfinanceafrica.org

The Centre of Affordable Housing Finance in Africa (CAHF) in partnership with GTAC has produced for the CSP and its partners a focus note on the impact of municipal rates policies on the affordable sector.

The authority of municipalities to set own annual property rates policies—a substantial role in own revenue capacity—is an opportunity to balance revenue objectives with efforts to assist low income households as part of city poverty reduction and local economic development mandates. The affordability of home ownership for low income households is challenged by bond payments, and utility charges and property rates. Rates policies instruments—such as the Residential Exclusion Threshold (RET) and means-tested rates rebates for low income households—can power investment in local residential property markets while also improving the affordability of home ownership for low income households. CAHF focuses on the felt and potential impact of COVID-19 on metro rates revenue. Then, using Lightstone’s 2019 deeds data, it analyses the RET’s impact on the affordable housing sector. With better use of valuation and deeds data, metros can more accurately target the RET, and improve its accuracy in supporting the affordable housing sector.



8 April 2021NoResidential Property Marketshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=8888
 
  

The workshop is a platform for cities to exchange new ideas and approaches to MBT reform and improvements and help shape thinking around...

2021-12-12 12:00 AM4https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=4

The minibus-taxi (MBT) industry plays a core role in public transport networks in South African cities. National Treasury and the National Department of Transport are assisting cities in rethinking the infrastructure-heavy, BRT-oriented reform approach and explore a second wave of IPTN development that focuses on hybrid systems where the MBT sector is more equitably and thoughtfully included in the transport system, as well as in more integrated transport and land-use planning. The workshop therefore a platform for cities to exchange new ideas and approaches to MBT reform and improvements and help shape thinking around the next phase of the support for MBT reform and IPTN planning and implementation.

7 March 2018YesMini-Bus Taxi Reformhttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=2828
 
  

The 39th annual SATC, scheduled for the 5-7th July 2021, will have a session hosted by the City Support Programme, focussing on spatial transformation. The CSP will be showcasing its spatial transformation agenda in three areas, namely Human Settlements; Economic Development and Public Transport.

2021-07-19 12:00 AM25https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=25

Malebo Matolong: malebo.matolong@Treasury.gov.za

The 39th annual SATC, scheduled for the 5-7th July 2021, will have a session hosted by the City Support Programme, focussing on spatial transformation. The CSP will be showcasing its spatial transformation agenda in three areas, namely Human Settlements; Economic Development and Public Transport.

7 July 2021NoSNDB & DBhttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=353535; 34; 134
 
  

​The Cities Support Programme has embarked on an initiative to expand a number of recommendations and best practices from pilot initiatives looking at the complex and compounding challenges of title deed reforms in our cities.

2022-05-07 12:00 AM44https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=44

​karen.harrison@treasury.gov.za

The Cities Support Programme has embarked on an initiative to expand a number of recommendations and best practices from pilot initiatives looking at the complex and compounding challenges of title deed reforms in our cities.

The story of housing delivery post ’94 re: delivery is impressive. Greater than 4million housing opportunities have been created in that period. However, not all beneficiaries have access to their title deeds - the conduit to formal recognition , legal status, asset creation and land administration for government. Without that title deed, households cannot access affordable finance, legally transfer property to other parties and navigate estate management when beneficiaries pass on. 

There’s a multitude of reasons for this outcome: some simple, others complex. Bottom line in spite of governments best efforts we have not been able to progress the transfer and rectification of title deeds as had been hoped. The inter-governmental response needed has landed the issue within the Operation Vulindlela programme within the Presidency and this CSP programme seeks to augment that inter-government collaboration effort at the metro scale with three partners in the coming months.

This expert panel discussion was a masterclass in setting the scene for the Metro Title Support Reform Programme. The panelists are:

Gavin Adlington - Lead Land Administration Specialist at CGAP/ World Bank Group - who has global experience on capitalist and socialist reform in respect of land administration.

Chris Carter: MD at GeoAfrika Technologies - reflecting on the iLembe political initiatives in KZN

Dr. Nuthan Maharaj  - SNDB Co-ordinator, Economic Development Unit, eThekwini Municipality 

Illana Melzer - Illana is the engagement manager at 71point4 and a primary driver of the Khayelitsha Transaction Support Centre in Cape Town. 

Graeme Ball - Chief Technologist eThekwini Metro and Nonhlanhla Qhobosheane KZN NDHS also provide details responding to the questions raised during the panel members’ input.

It makes for a fascinating listen and sets out the opportunities and pitfalls facing the role-players seeking to address systems and regulations to enhance efficiency and deal with the backlogs we face.
4 May 2022YesSNDB & DBhttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=3535
 
  

​The objective of the MYBR engagements is for National Treasury to perform its oversight function in terms of the MFMA and related regulations and Circulars.

2021-12-12 12:00 AM7https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=7

​The objective of the MYBR engagements is for National Treasury to perform its oversight function in terms of the MFMA and related regulations and Circulars. The engagements cover the audited results of the previous financial year, the mid-year results of the current financial year and the budget planning for the forthcoming financial year.

30 June 2020NoPM3 Stakeholder Coordination https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=7878
 
  

​The Cities Support Programme in partnership with the World Bank Group convened a session focused on the enabling policies and regulations required to support informal trade on the 30th June 2020.

2021-12-12 12:00 AM8https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=8
Karen Harrison: CSP-NT
Karen.Harrison@treasury.gov.za


The Cities Support Programme in partnership with the World Bank Group convened a session focused on the enabling policies and regulations required to support informal trade on the 30th June 2020.

The global COVID-19 pandemic has caused great disruption to the conventional norms of work, living and movement of people. Restrictions on movements and economic activities, imposed as part of the country's Lockdown Regulations, have had a severe impact on the informal sector. This webinar sought to solicit inputs from informal trader organisations, sector and global experts and South African government representatives, to explore policy recommendations and regulations in support of informal trade.

Panelists that participated in the event included:
  • Phumzile Xulu from the South African Informal Worker Association
  • Brian Phalooh from the South African Informal Traders' Forum
  • Rosheda Muller from the South African Informal Traders' Alliance
  • Gog' Lulama Mali from the Joburg Informal Traders' Platform
  • Sthembiso Garane from the City of Ekurhuleni
  • Thulani Nzama from the Ethekwini Metro
The webinar highlighted the need for cities to shift from a focus on law enforcement to recognising and supporting the informal sector in performing its significant social and economic role. The importance of collaboration between the sector and local government was highlighted and the need to build capabilities within both to enable this. The range of instruments that cities have at their disposal to enable the informal economy was highlighted, including: service delivery, licensing, access to land and buildings, supportive services such as storage and access to child care; management of informal trader spaces; and facilitating digital access. Cities also had an immediate role in assisting informal traders address health and safety issues related to Covid-19.
30 June 2020YesLand Based Financing Innovationhttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=4343
 
  

​Increased frequency of heat wave events is predicted to be the “new normal” this century, posing grave challenges to humans and the built environment. Left unchecked, increased heat events will contribute substantially to health impacts and mortality. 

2022-05-06 12:00 AM43https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=43
​Anthea Stephens: anthea.stephens@treasury.gov.za

Increased frequency of heat wave events is predicted to be the “new normal” this century, posing grave challenges to humans and the built environment. Left unchecked, increased heat events will contribute substantially to health impacts and mortality. According to projections, the number of extremely hot days in the greater Johannesburg region each year may double in coming decades, from 35 to 70 days per year . In response, the Cities Support Program (CSP) is providing technical assistance to the City of Johannesburg and the City of Ekurhuleni as part of advancing climate resilience in South Africa’s metropolitan areas.

Using heat monitoring sensors mounted on tripods, in early 2022 more than 100 community members in Johannesburg and Ekurhuleni took part in a 'citizen science' data collection campaign. Through measuring air temperatures and humidity across the neighborhoods of Braamfontein, Kliptown, Lombardy, Actonville, Primrose and Tembisa this participatory approach is helping inform the preparation of city action plans to adapt to extreme heat.

Community members participating in the fieldwork first learned about the impacts of climate change, discussed how it affects people’s day to day lives in their neighborhoods and were trained in the methods and instruments used to take the climatic measurements. To understand how building materials and trees affect temperatures, readings were taken in green and shady areas as well as places with heat-trapping paved surfaces and no shade.

The heat and humidity readings will be used as part of a climate modeling study that will estimate the impacts of urban heat for health, labor productivity, and energy demand in 2030 and 2050, and help identify options for keeping Johannesburg and Ekurhuleni cool. As well as supporting the collection of urban heat measurements, the participatory approach will help bring communities’ knowledge and voices into the planning process.  A final study and set of recommendations are expected by mid-2022. The technical assistance is supported by the World Bank and the Swiss Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO). 

Today many cities around the world are developing action plans to mitigate the impact of growing heat exposure through measures which encompass increasing public parks and green space, health outreach campaigns for elderly people, heatwave alerts, and building designs for cooler neighborhoods. Through the partnership with Johannesburg and Ekuhurleni, the CSP is further advancing such knowledge for the betterment of South Africa’s cities.



3 May 2022NoClimate Resilient Capital Investmentshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=1919
 
  

The Centre for Affordable Housing Centre (CAHF) has produced 8 metro reports and an overview report on the residential property market for the National Treasury’s Cities Support Programme through the GTAC-CAHF partnership.

2021-11-30 12:00 AM15https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=15

​Seth Maqetuka

The Centre for Affordable Housing Centre (CAHF) has produced 8 metro reports and an overview report on the residential property market for the National Treasury’s Cities Support Programme through the GTAC-CAHF partnership.

These reports focus on government-subsidised housing. Well over half of all South African housing caters to lower income groups with 57% located in the eight metros alone. This unrecognised, untapped and sometimes challenging property segment could significantly contribute to city-level post-pandemic economic recovery with benefits reaching low income communities.

To realise these benefits, the report recommends the public and private sectors have roles to play in formalising informal residential property transactions; supporting Transaction Support Centres to help low income communities resolve titling issues; applying planning tools more strategically to boost spatial transformation; implementing area-based green lining to support mortgage and non-mortgage finance coupled with targeted municipal investment in low value areas; and broadening of municipal rates bases by resolving title backlogs and informal title situations.

3 March 2021YesResidential Property Marketshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=8888
 
  

​The eThekwini metro and its partners, supported by the CSP, are convening a virtual meeting to reflect on the Safer City Strategy, its Implementation Plan and the role of transversal management, to clarify the next steps for implementation and the roles and responsibilities of eThekwini staff and other role-players.

2021-12-12 12:00 AM22https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=22
Thulani C. Msomi: Thulani.Msomi@durban.gov.za
Nomsa Shembe: nomusa.shembe@durban.gov.za
Lungile Madlala: lungile.madlala@treasury.gov.za
Bernadette Leon: Bernadette.leon@treasury.gov.za



​​The eThekwini metro and its partners, supported by the CSP, are convening a virtual meeting to reflect on the Safer City Strategy, its Implementation Plan and the role of transversal management, to clarify the next steps for implementation and the roles and responsibilities of eThekwini staff and other role-players.

3 June 2021NoCoaching and Facilitation, Change Management, and Transversal Managementhttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=1414
 
  

​The 5th Community of Practice (COP) held on the 21 October 2021, focused on the difficult issue of unauthorised land occupation. The National Department of Human Settlements shared a presentation on proposed amendments to the PIE Act. The Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa (CAHF) made a presentation on the impact of unauthorised land occupation on municipal service delivery and planning, as well as the financial impact on local government budgets, from both the expenditure and revenue perspectives....read more

2022-03-11 12:00 AM27https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=27

​Seth Maqetuka: seth.maqetuka@treasury.gov.za

​The 5th Community of Practice (COP) held on the 21 October 2021, focused on the difficult issue of unauthorised land occupation. The National Department of Human Settlements shared a presentation on proposed amendments to the PIE Act. The Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa (CAHF) made a presentation on the impact of unauthorised land occupation on municipal service delivery and planning, as well as the financial impact on local government budgets, from both the expenditure and revenue perspectives. The COP is a joint initiative of CAHF, the CSP of National Treasury, and SALGA and was established in 2019 as a regular platform intended to address issues of housing finance, spatial planning and housing development in cities. The purpose of the Community of Practice on Human Settlements Finance is to provide a knowledge-sharing platform for research on residential property markets and the built environment finance framework.


​Link to project page

29 October 2021NoResidential Property Marketshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=8888
 
  

​Despite Year 2’s domination by the COVID-19 pandemic, the CSP managed to adapt and produce good results. The pandemic pushed the team to build resilience and accelerate innovative ways of working within the CSP, the metros and in the intergovernmental arena. CSP2 focused on supporting the national economic recovery agenda with metros and linked its metro water and energy reforms work to Operation Vulindlela’s economic growth initiatives.

2021-11-30 12:00 AM29https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=29

​Bernadette Leon: Bernadette.Leon@Treasury.gov.za

​​Despite Year 2’s domination by the COVID-19 pandemic, the CSP managed to adapt and produce good results. The pandemic pushed the team to build resilience and accelerate innovative ways of working within the CSP, the metros and in the intergovernmental arena. CSP2 focused on supporting the national economic recovery agenda with metros and linked its metro water and energy reforms work to Operation Vulindlela’s economic growth initiatives.

29 October 2021YesPM18 Programme Evaluationshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=8686
 
  
The month of October is designated as Urban October, as declared by the United Nations. During Urban October, governments, NGOs, and communities are encouraged to be in conversation about the challenges and opportunities created by the rapid change in our cities. Urban October ends with World Cities Day on the 31st of October, which is dedicated to the promotion of sustainable urban development globally. Watch ​eThekwini Video Story
2021-11-05 12:00 AM30https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=30


​Anthea Stephens: anthea.stephens@treasury.gov.za

The month of October is designated as Urban October, as declared by the United Nations. During Urban October, governments, NGOs, and communities are encouraged to be in conversation about the challenges and opportunities created by the rapid change in our cities. Urban October ends with World Cities Day on the 31st of October, which is dedicated to the promotion of sustainable urban development globally. To commemorate 2021’s World Cities Day, under the theme “Adapting Cities for Climate Resilience”, eThekwini, in partnership with the UN Habitat, convened an online event to launch a publication on the findings and recommendations of an Emergency Preparedness and Response Lessons Learned Exercise (LLE) undertaken by eThekwini.

This report emanated from support offered by National Treasury’s Cities Support Programme together with the World Bank’s Global Facility for Disaster Risk Reduction. Following severe floods in 2019, eThekwini wanted to know how they could improve their response to disasters. Through the CSP, the World Bank facilitated an emergency preparedness and response Lessons Learnt Exercise with eThekwini and other stakeholders involved in emergency response.

The ‘Lessons Learned Exercise for Emergency Preparedness and Response’ (EP&R) was designed as a collaborative project between the South Africa National Treasury’s Cities Support Programme (CSP), eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality, and the World Bank. The exercise was conducted between June and October 2020, with a virtual engagement process between 31 August and 11 September 2020. This LLE which was conducted against the backdrop of the COVID-19 emergency in 2020—and in light of travel and other restrictions—was the first ever to be conducted entirely through remote engagement.

The LLE generated recommendations to strengthen emergency preparedness and response in eThekwini that address issues pertaining to the legal and institutional framework, information, facilities, equipment, and personnel. The implementation of prioritised recommendations is being taken forward in the city and nationally.

The CSP and World Bank team acknowledge the passion, drive and inspirational leadership of Bongumusa Zondo in the online engagements, without which the LLE could not have gained the input and support from more than 84 stakeholders across multiple and diverse engagements. The LLE and this final report greatly benefited from the input and guidance of Ané Bruwer, Chief Director at the National Disaster Management Centre, Sibongiseni Ngema Chief Director of the Provincial Disaster Management Centre, and Vincent Ngubane, Head of the eThekwini Disaster Management Centre. Steve Middleton, Head of Durban Metropolitan Police Service, and Enock Mchunu, Head of Fire and Emergency Services provided critical input on local emergency response operations. A wide range of officials from eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality provided technical guidance; they included personnel from the Disaster Management and Emergency Control Unit, Finance and Pensions, Health, Fleet Services, Coastal Engineering and Stormwater Catchment Management, Information Communication Technology (ICT), Corporate Communications, Supply Chain Management, Performance Management, Enterprise Risk Management, Community Participation and Action Support Unit, and Human Settlements.

29 October 2021NoClimate Resilient Planninghttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=1818
 
  
This CSP (IGR-NT) convened discussion was attended by 67 participants from metros, sector departments and other organisations -receiving inputs from all 8 metros on the financial impact on municipalities of water and sanitation responses to COVID-19.
2021-11-30 12:00 AM13https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=13
This CSP (IGR-NT) convened discussion was attended by 67 participants from metros, sector departments and other organisations -receiving inputs from all 8 metros on the financial impact on municipalities of water and sanitation responses to COVID-19.
The meeting identified areas of immediate support to cities to address:
  1. The imperative to rapidly improve water and sanitation services in informal settlements, a key risk for the rapid spread of COVID-19, with devastating health and economic consequences; and
  2. The very serious financial impacts of COVID-19 on the viability and sustainability of water services as a result of the economic impacts of the shut-down and recovery periods.
Preliminary Remarks
  • Discussion not about more money.
  • NT overview & guidance
    • Economic and financial context very difficult and will get worse.
    • This is a marathon and not a sprint
    • Carry on billing, but anticipate reduced revenues & reduced cash flow
    • Anticipate additional spending, but can repurpose conditional grants
    • Stay on core mandate and don't spend on unfunded mandates
    • Be careful of decisions with long-term consequences (eg. recruitment, additional service obligations, service choices)
  • NT CSP role limited to technical assistance
Short Term and Immediate Issues
  • Existing stresses are made worse
    • E.g., drought, NRW, poor payment levels, under-maintenance
  • Service standards in IS are very low
    • One toilet per 10 households
    • Cleaned/emptied once per week
  • IS are not a permanent feature in metros (not going away, but growing)
  • Short-term response in metros in IS appears to depend largely on
    • Chemical toilets for additional services. These are expensive, what happens later on?
    • Water Tanks and tankers for short term response. These are expensive, what happens later on?
  • Reallocation of resources
    • Substantial additional budgets in some metros in 2019/20, but what about 2020/21, and is this sustainable?
    • In short term, most can be funded by reallocations, but outlook for 2020/21 is unclear.
    • Anticipated reduction in staffing availability was a risk mentioned only in some metros. Is this risk being addressed adequately?
Medium Term Issues
  • Managing in a much more difficult economic and financial context
    • Higher expenses
    • Lower affordability
    • Reduced revenues (initial estimates look very significant, even for 2019/20)
  • Higher costs of borrowing (still to come)
29 April 202013NoWater Resiliencehttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=2121
 
  

​The CSP, in partnership with the World Bank Group and the DTIC held a successful webinar event on the 28th October 2021 that shared appropriate institutional models and management structures for industrial spaces globally and in South Africa..read more

2021-10-29 12:00 AM28https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=28

​Karen Harrison: Karen.Harrison@Treasury.gov.za

The CSP, in partnership with the World Bank Group and the DTIC held a successful webinar event on the 28th October 2021 that shared appropriate institutional models and management structures for industrial spaces globally and in South Africa. The webinar brought together a range of actors representing the metros and non-metro municipalities, provincial development agencies, SEZ Companies, and the formal and informal private sector. The webinar event included framing presentations by the CSP on the metro industrial park revitalisation pilots and from the DTIC on its industrial park revitalisation programme. Global experts from the EBG presented case-studies from Malaysia, Vietnam and Turkey. South African panellist respondents included representatives from the AIDC, SA Clusters, the City of Johannesburg, the Durban South Women in Business Association and the South African Informal Traders’ Alliance.


​​Link to project page

28 October 2021YesIndustrial Park revitalisationhttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=3434
 
  

The Transaction Support Centre (TSC), was selected out of 151 submissions as a Top 4 finalist under the Best Practices category for the Africa Housing Forum Innovation Awards 2022.

2022-05-06 12:00 AM42https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=42

​​Seth Maqetuka: seth.maqetuka@treasury.gov.za

The Transaction Support Centre selected as Top 4 finalist in the Africa Housing Forum Innovation Awards 2022.

28 April 2022: The Transaction Support Centre (TSC), was selected out of 151 submissions as a Top 4 finalist under the Best Practices category for the Africa Housing Forum Innovation Awards 2022. The awards aim to demonstrate the importance of strategic collaboration that fosters innovations in affordable housing solutions, especially through people-public-private partnerships.

Launched in 2018, the TSC is an action-research project that supports formal tenure and property rights for low-income urban households in South Africa. The project is a joint initiative of affordable housing think-tank, CAHF and research and data consultancy, 71point4.

"We are delighted to receive this global recognition for the TSC project", says Kecia Rust, Executive Director at the Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa (CAHF) and co-founder of the TSC project.

Since its inception, the TSC has logged over 1 400 client cases. "The majority of clients come to the TSC for help with resolving title deed issues, which stem from informal property market transactions that have taken place in the past, properties not being transferred out of deceased estates, and the large title deed backlog on government-subsidised properties," says Illana Melzer, Director at 71point4.

"We have a unique situation in South Africa where there is a relatively large population of asset-rich but cash poor property-owning households due to the Government's subsidised housing programme. These households simply cannot afford the legal costs and expenses to formally transfer a property. And due to the title deed backlog, some households can't engage with the formal system even if they wanted to" says Melzer. Beyond the cost of transfers, the current administrative processes are slow, cumbersome, and complicated to navigate. It should be no surprise that off-register transactions are prevalent in lower-income neighbourhoods.

Following a bottom-up approach, the TSC provides hands-on assistance to clients with their various title deed issues and uses these day-to-day experiences and interactions to identify opportunities for improvement in policy, legislative and administrative domains. The TSC also works closely with private sector partners including banks and conveyancing firms. "Our private sector partners are critical to the success of the TSC, both in terms of their direct assistance on client cases and their engagement on the broader systemic changes that need attention," says Rust. The TSC's recent pilot to offer services out of the FNB branch in Khayelitsha is an example of the potential to leverage the private sector to tackle the very significant title deed challenge in South Africa.

To date the project has helped almost 500 clients receive their title deeds. While the team is thrilled with each and every title deed handout, they realise this is a drop in the ocean compared to the scale of the problem. "In order to create a functioning formal property market which caters to the breadth of its participants, we need to tackle the triple challenge of bringing back properties that have transacted off-register into the formal system (formalisation), tackling the primary transfer backlog (regularisation) and creating an affordable, accessible system that makes it as easy as possible to preserve title going forward (preservation)," says Melzer. The rich evidence base developed over the past three years' of the TSC's operation will go a long way in helping to develop a new approach that is so badly needed.

"What many people don't realise is just how significant the RDP property market is," says Rust. According to CAHF's research, roughly one third of the 6.7 million formally registered residential properties in South Africa were built by government and transferred to their owners entirely for free. These properties hold significant economic and wealth distribution potential for beneficiary households. But if the status quo continues, this potential (and the state's investment) notwithstanding, will remain compromised.

The TSC has achieved a lot in a short period and in the face of numerous challenges, including pivoting to a remote model of working due to Covid. But more needs to be done to really shift the needle on this problem and it will require a dedicated effort across all levels of Government and the private sector, says Rust.

Following its nomination, the TSC has been invited to present the initiative to a panel of judges and audience at the Africa Housing Forum hosted by Habitat for Humanity International Africa on 13 May 2022 in Nairobi, Kenya. For more information about the awards and the other finalists, visit: https://africahousingforum.org/awards/ You can also follow the TSC's work on its Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/TransactionSupportCentre

The TSC is currently funded by Oppenheimer Generations and is actively supported by the Cities Support Programme of the South African National Treasury.

About CAHF

The Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa (CAHF) is an independent think tank in South Africa with a mission of making Africa's housing finance markets work. CAHF's work extends across the continent, and it is supported by and collaborates with a range of funders and partners. CAHF brings information to the marketplace to enable stakeholders in the public and private sector to make policy and investment decisions in favour of improved access to affordable housing. Our emphasis is on the role that finance plays in realising this, and we champion market intelligence—data, market analytics and research—to stimulate investor interest and to support better policy. We are highly networked and engage with stakeholders at the local, national, regional, continental and global levels to support the realisation of investment towards affordable housing in Africa.

Website: https://housingfinanceafrica.org/projects/transaction-support-centre/

About 71point4 Consulting

71point4 is a Cape Town-based strategic research and data consultancy specialising in consumer-focused, data-driven research. We use a wide array of research methodologies and data sources ranging from big data to small, qualitative data to help our clients drive change in transformational sectors that contribute to economic development in South Africa and across the continent. Our team comprises data scientists, economists and marketers with diverse but complimentary skills. Collectively we have deep research experience across a range of sectors and topics including financial sector development and inclusion, housing markets and housing finance, credit markets and indebtedness, healthcare and youth employment.

Website: https://www.71point4.com/Projects/the-transaction-support-centre/

Press contact:

Jessica Breier

Consultant, 71point4

jess@71point4.com


28 April 2022YesResidential Property Marketshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=8888
 
  
The Presidential Climate Commission (PCC) produced a draft Just Transition Framework  - an opportunity for cities to chart a path for their contribution to the just transition.

2022-03-23 12:00 AM41https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=41

​Anthea Stephens: anthea.stephens@treasury.gov.za

The Presidential Climate Commission (PCC) produced a draft Just Transition Framework - an opportunity for cities to chart a path for their contribution to the just transition.

In a series of Roundtables, the CSP at National Treasury, SALGA and SACN bring together city voices with key stakeholders to discuss considerations and implications of the just transition for cities; what cities can and should do, and how they can input into the Just Transition Framework.
23 March 2022NoClimate Resilient Planninghttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=1818
 
  

The Cities Support Programme and the World Bank have produced Final Draft Small Scale Affordable Rental Housing reports (SSAR) for discussion and comments at this stage. The first report is the Scoping Report that investigated the extent and nature of SSAR in the South African Cities.

2022-02-21 12:00 AM33https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=33

​The Cities Support Programme and the World Bank have produced Final Draft Small Scale Affordable Rental Housing reports (SSAR) for discussion and comments at this stage. The first report is the Scoping Report that investigated the extent and nature of SSAR in the South African Cities. The reports are the outcome of a document review and stakeholder consultations. The second report is the Engagement Framework whose aim is to decide and have better understanding of the issues affecting on the scaling up and formalisation of the small-scale affordable housing. The Framework is particularly supplying a template from which the CSP and World Bank would be piloting SSAR in Delft, Cape Town and Tembisa, Ekurhuleni in Gauteng. Your comments on these two draft reports would be greatly appreciated.

23 December 2021NoHousing Rental Optionshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=3030
 
  

​The second meeting of a Community of Practice (CoP) series was held on 21st October 2021 with the objective of sharing experiences of municipalities and other stakeholders on new generation capacity (the first CoP was held in May 2021). The October explored modalities, opportunities, and innovative approaches regarding wheeling which municipalities could take advantage of. 

2021-11-05 12:00 AM31https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=31

​​Anthea Stephens: anthea.stephens@treasury.gov.za

The second meeting of a Community of Practice (CoP) series was held on 21st October 2021 with the objective of sharing experiences of municipalities and other stakeholders on new generation capacity (the first CoP was held in May 2021). The October explored modalities, opportunities, and innovative approaches regarding wheeling which municipalities could take advantage of. Given that the approach to wheeling is still novel, the CoP provided a useful platform for municipalities to learn from each other and to navigate – together – practical issues surrounding implementation.

The National Energy Regulator (NERSA) with its mandate for setting and approving electricity tariffs and prices, and the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) which is facilitating a municipal Wheeling Working Group, with support from GIZ, provided context for the engagement. Two insightful case studies were presented by George and Nelson Mandela Bay municipalities, sharing their first-hand experience of critical facets of their tariff approach, the regulator-required Cost of Supply Study and tariff determination, modelled for realisation of revenue. Both municipalities had important objectives in common, including to provide better services to electricity customers while incentivising customers to remain on the grid. The case studies highlighted that applying a cost reflective time of use tariff assists in ensuring that electricity prices are as low as possible and contributes towards the sustainability of the municipality.
The interactive discussion, which followed reflections on the case studies from SALGA and Sustainable Energy Africa (SEA), gave rise to technical questions around success factors for piloting and eventual roll-out, and billing structures. These highlighted the key issues on the minds of participants, while deepening shared learning. The discussion pivoted on the complexities surrounding wheeling approaches and agreements and the resultant need for flexible and adaptable business models. The following central points were made:
  • Policy reform and needs to be inclusive. While aspects of energy policy reform are taking place, the future goal and overall direction of the sector remains uncertain.
  • Wheeling agreements are not a mechanism for adjusting for underlying tariff structure issues. These underlying issues need to be addressed separately.
  • The differentiated circumstances and capacities across the municipalities make it challenging to ensure that no-one is left behind in this process.
  • Electricity distributors hold a social responsibility that must be managed and costed for over time.
  • Municipalities will need to increase their internal legal capacities to enable them to act and negotiate effectively in the new generation capacity space, and particularly to manage their risk.

This CoP meeting raised many pertinent questions and issues and provided significant insights regarding the regulatory, legal and policy lacunas surrounding new generation capacity in general and wheeling in distribution networks. The next CoP, planned for early 2022, will continue to navigate the complexities that characterise the changing role of municipalities regarding new generation capacity.
21 October 2021NoSustainability within the Municipal Energy Sectorhttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=2323
 
  

​The main purpose of the technical working session on the draft Systems Dynamics model in Ekurhuleni was to demonstrate the systems dynamics model and different scenarios.....

2022-02-28 12:00 AM36https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=36

​Malebo Matolong: malebo.matolong@treasury.gov.za

​The main purpose of the technical working session on the draft Systems Dynamics model in Ekurhuleni was to demonstrate the systems dynamics model and different scenarios, discuss the way forward with respect to calibration and discuss interfacing between the Department responsible for transport system service delivery and other transversal departments (human settlements, economic development and city planning). The work session invite was also extended to NT – LGBA.

21 February 2022YesDevolution of Provincial Bus Functions to Metros as a Case Study for the Development of PToG Architecturehttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=2727
 
  

​The online training for Urban Reforms course is free to anyone who can access the internet and is hosted by the National Treasury. It can currently be accessed via a link GoMuni by clicking on public access under the SIGN IN instead of using the username and password options.

2022-02-28 12:00 AM37https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=37

​Refilwe Makaula: refilwe.makaula@treasury.gov.za

​The online training for Urban Reforms course is free to anyone who can access the internet and is hosted by the National Treasury. It can currently be accessed via a link GoMuni by clicking on public access under the SIGN IN instead of using the username and password options.

21 February 2022NoPlanning Reformshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=55
 
  

​The National Treasury Cities Support Programme will be launching the CIDMS Implementation Reference Group with the eight (8) South African cities. 

2022-02-28 12:00 AM38https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=38

​Samantha Naidoo: samantha.naidu@treasury.gov.za

The National Treasury Cities Support Programme will be launching the CIDMS Implementation Reference Group with the eight (8) South African cities. The purpose of the reference group will be to provide oversight and strategic direction for the roll out of the CIDMS Implementation Support project and other related project elements, as well as overseeing the functioning of the CIDMS Community of Practice. The first meeting of the reference group is scheduled for 2 March 2022

21 February 2022YesCities Infrastructure Delivery and Management systemhttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=1616
 
  

Doing Business in South Africa 2018 is the second edition of the subnational Doing Business series in South Africa.

2021-12-12 12:00 AM6https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=6
Documents
Deputy Minister's Speech
Media release
Overview and results presentation

Resources
The link to the report - www.doingbusiness.org/Southafrica

​South African cities are making efforts to improve the ease of doing business, although the pace of reforms has been slow in the last three years, according to a new World Bank Group report that was launched at the National Treasury on the 19th September 2018. Doing Business in South Africa 2018 is the second edition of the subnational Doing Business series in South Africa. The first edition was published in 2015. The reports are produced by the World Bank Group at the request of National Treasury of South Africa, as part of the Cities Support Programme, and funded by the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs of Switzerland, SECO. The study was implemented in collaboration with the, the Department of Trade and Industry and the South African Cities Network.

19 September 2018YesSNDB & DBhttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=3535
 
  

​The Resilient Project Preparation Workshop, the second in the series of three, was held virtually from 16-18 November 2021. Delivered in a collaboration between the CSP, the World Bank's Urban Practice and City Resilience Program, and funded by the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO).....

2022-02-28 12:00 AM32https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=32

​Anthea Stephens: anthea.stephens@treasury.gov.za

The Resilient Project Preparation Workshop, the second in the series of three, was held virtually from 16-18 November 2021. Delivered in a collaboration between the CSP, the World Bank's Urban Practice and City Resilience Program, and funded by the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO), the event explored tools to develop business models for resilience-informed capital projects in seven South African metros (Buffalo City, Cape Town, Ekurhuleni, eThekwini, Johannesburg, Mangaung and Tshwane).

In order to drive discussions and learning outcomes, presentations relied on a mix of South African and international practitioners who centred their interventions around five themes spread over three days:

  • On the first day, speakers focused on the challenges of integrating resilience into project design and how to improve the economics of resilience investments including case studies from the Gran Malecon flood mitigating (and public use) waterfront in Barranquilla, Colombia, and hearing from the Resilience Program Manager from Miami-Dade in Florida, USA, on how to design for resilience in a city surrounded by water.
  • On the second day, speakers from private sector investors shared tips and good practice examples about how the private sector would want to see climate risk dealt with in project design, followed by interventions from a number of public sector professionals from C40 and the World Bank supported Msimbazi Basin redevelopment in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, discussing the role of project governance frameworks in ensuring stakeholder buy in to resilience investments.
  • On the last day, following an intervention from an ex-advisor to the Mayor of Tirana, Albania, participants worked on finding ways to strengthen how to make the case to decision makers for resilience investments including through more tailored analysis, for example going beyond traditional cost-benefit analysis, and also how to tie these data points with other considerations important to elected officials.

    Working through a series of breakout sessions, metro officials presented back on how they, in light of the experiences shared during the workshop, would build stronger business cases for their proposed projects. Despite the diverse types of investment and the individual situations of each metro, a number of common conclusions were reached:
  • The importance of stakeholder engagement – as one panellist spoke, "projects are for people", a statement that is particularly true in urban settings close or indeed where people live, work and spend their time.
  • The need to think long term – in a context where immediate and urgent needs in cities tend to shape decision making towards the short term, the workshop refocused attention on the 20, 30 and even 50+ year planning horizon critical to ensure projects planned now deliver on their objectives
  • The value of success – multiple speakers highlighted the need to break large projects down into bite size chunks, allowing for short term successes while slowly building out the wider vision; similarly, where metros are testing new approaches, the urgent need for investment across the country makes learning from their experiences and seeking to scale successes important

The findings of the workshop will now be carried into a parallel stream of project level support being delivered by the CSP and World Bank team, with funding from SECO and the Global Infrastructure Facility. The series of workshops will conclude in early to mid-2022 with a third event looking at how metros can seek to raise capital for their planned investments.


16 November 2021YesClimate Resilient Capital Investmentshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=1919
 
  

The National Treasuries of South Africa and Kenya, supported by the  World Bank, hosted a successful peer learning event to exchange idea on how to mainstream climate change into macro-fiscal frameworks. 

2022-03-18 12:00 AM40https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=40

​Anthea Stephens: anthea.stephens@treasury.gov.za

​The National Treasuries of South Africa and Kenya, supported by the  World Bank, hosted a successful peer learning event to exchange idea on how to mainstream climate change into macro-fiscal frameworks. This is the first of a series of peer exchanges, that will draw from the experience of Finance Ministries such as, Kenya, Rwanda, Colombia, Germany and Canada to better enrich the South Africa approach in defining our climate change programme of action. 

16 March 2022YesClimate Resilient Planninghttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=1818
 
  

National Treasury's Cities Support Programme (CSP) makes spatially aggregated employment and firm level data at a sub-municipal level publicly available. National Treasury today made available spatial data mined from anonymised administrative tax data documenting employment and firm level statistics at a sub-municipal level longitudinally.


2021-12-06 12:00 AM19https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=19
Karen Harrison

National Treasury's Cities Support Programme (CSP) makes spatially aggregated employment and firm level data at a sub-municipal level publicly available

National Treasury today made available spatial data mined from anonymised administrative tax data documenting employment and firm level statistics at a sub-municipal level longitudinally. The data presented in eight metro reports includes information per tax year from 2013 to 2018 related to:

  • The number of weighted employees per main place (including data disaggregated by age groups, gender, wage bands and industry information)
  • The number of firms per main place (including data disaggregated by firm size, employment and turnover trends, export status and the number of new and closed firms)

South African cities and towns are characterised by a spatial mismatch between where people live and economic activity – one of the legacies of Apartheid spatial planning - resulting in the exclusion of a large percentage of the population (particularly lower income and historically disadvantaged groups) from participating in the economy. This type of data is integral to support the work of policymakers and planners within our municipalities to make better informed, data-driven decisions and policies to address these structural inequalities within our cities and boost economic growth; whether that be identifying locations for low-income housing, evaluating transportation infrastructure investment, how we subsidise various modes of transport or identifying areas earmarked for commercial or industrial investment. This is also valuable to academic institutions, civil society organisations, think tanks, private sector entities and active citizens who can all contribute to improving South Africa.

There has historically been a dearth of economic data relating to firms and jobs available in South Africa, particularly at a sub-metro level. While substantial work is done by organisations such as Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) producing important economic data, their primary mandate is not focussed on this lower level information. Similarly, while there are various private sector organisations that repurpose national, provincial and municipal level economic statistics (typically from Stats SA) into sub-municipal level information; these process are opaque black boxes and are fraught with issues including that they typically rely on census data to disaggregate (which provides information on where people live rather than work) as well as only being accessible for a premium. Metros in South Africa have consistently requested this type of data from various government agencies and departments; and have on numerous occasions conducted expensive industry and firm specific surveys to attempt to fill this data gap. Now this data will be made available nationally to support all municipalities. While the use of this data fills a major gap within a drive for more evidence-based policy within government, as it is based on administrative tax data it excludes information on the informal sector and non-tax registered firms and individuals.

The project was made possible by a collaboration between the South African Revenue Service (SARS) and National Treasury (NT), who in 2015, in partnership with the United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER), set up a secure data facility – based at National Treasury in Tshwane – to host the highly sensitive and anonymised administrative tax data collected by SARS during revenue collection. This was done to support evidenced-based policy and research by various departments within NT as well as researchers (who can apply to gain access to the data facility). Data within the facility includes information related to Company Income Tax (CIT), Personal Income Tax (PIT), Value Added Tax (VAT) and Customs. The project utilised this completely anonymised tax data to create these spatially aggregated data within our cities, while still ensuring that individuals and firms are not identifiable within the data. The intention will be to prepare and make available panel data sets on an annual basis for metros and researchers to access.

National Treasury has entered a partnership with the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) to assist in the data mining for 2021 and to strengthen capacity within National Treasury and the metros to mine the data on a sustainable basis, to integrate this data with other data sets, and to analyse the data in a manner that can positively impact of integrated city planning and investment.


14 May 2021YesSpatialised economic datahttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=3636
 
  

​The CSP is hosting a workshop for the 8 metros In South Africa's metropolitan municipalities (metros), where a number of international experiences and lessons – relevant to the South African context – will be shared.

2021-11-30 12:00 AM20https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=20

​Seth Maqetuka

​The CSP is hosting a workshop for the 8 metros In South Africa's metropolitan municipalities (metros), where a number of international experiences and lessons – relevant to the South African context – will be shared. The World Bank will bring in experts including utility managers, regulators, city officials and program implementers to support these exchanges. World Bank experts with experience in South Africa and on improving services to informal communities from around the world will also be mobilized. The examples discussed will take into consideration the South Africa context and the situation highlighted during the roundtable discussion.

14 May 2021NoScaling Up Informal Settlements Upgradinghttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=88
 
  

​The BEPP approach is new and has been designed and tested by metros over the last four years in formulating, approving and implementing their BEPPs.

2021-12-12 12:00 AM5https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=5
Documents
  • Strategic Planning Led Budgeting v3 20052018
  • Outcomes Led Planning 29 May 2018
  • Fiscal Impacts Metro Experience 29 May 2018
  • Infrastructure Led Growth 29 May 2018
  • Alignment of Planning Budgeting & Capital Exp
  • IUDF planning instruments v7
  • MFMA Circular No. 88 Nov 2017
  • Reforming Regulatory Env Urban Reform Nov 2016
  • SDF Guidelines Review Rec Dec 2017
Presentations
  • Why have cities embarked on planning, budgeting and reporting
  • BEPP SDF Guidelines Review IUDF
  • NDP and NSDF
  • IUDF & sharpening the planning tools
  • International Perspectives on Planning Reform
  • Integration Syndicate Findings and Propositions
  • Outcomes Led Planning
  • Infrastructure-led growth through spatially targeted public investment
  • Best Practice guidelines for aligning
  • Fiscal Impacts Tool
  • Sharpening planning tools

​​The BEPP approach is new and has been designed and tested by metros over the last four years in formulating, approving and implementing their BEPPs. A key objective of the Planning Reforms seminar is to engage the body of planning practitioners, planning academics and planning policy makers to test the rigour and application of the BEPP method and approach.

13 June 2018NoPlanning Reforms - Annual Assessment of BEPPs 2020/21 MTREFhttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=7575
 
  

​The Centre of Affordable Housing Finance in Africa (CAHF) in partnership with GTAC has produced for the CSP and its partners a focus note on First-time Home Buyers.

2021-11-30 12:00 AM23https://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/pages/newsitem.aspx?itemID=23
Seth Maqetuka: seth.maqetuka@treasury.gov.za
Alison Tshangana: alison@housingfinanceafrica.org
Kecia Rust: kecia@housingfinanceafrica.org



​The Centre of Affordable Housing Finance in Africa (CAHF) in partnership with GTAC has produced for the CSP and its partners a focus note on First-time Home Buyers. CAHF’s analysis of Lightstone’s title deeds data shows the differentiated performance of the five main market segments, namely entry level, affordable, conventional, high-end and luxury. Surprising findings show that almost half of first-time home buyers entered the property market at the low end, thus acting as significant drivers of the property market in metros. The impact and driving forces of these first-time home buyers, in the context of COVID-19, highlight implications and suggest recommendations for metro support for this market.

12 May 2021NoResidential Property Marketshttps://csp.treasury.gov.za/csp/Pages/project.aspx?itemID=8888
1 - 30Next